airplay

Mercedes integrates Apple iphone – Siri will command new Merc A Class

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If you’re a fan of fine cellular phones, you might be a fan of fine automobiles. Damon Lavrinc over at AutoBlog is reporting that Mercedes Benz’s new A-Class luxury car will sport iPhone 4S Siri integration.

More intriguingly, Mercedes is the first automaker to support and integrate Apple’s Siri voice-recognition technology, allowing users to make appointments, send text messages and emails, get weather status and access all their songs through voice commands.

Of course, the top of the line products are almost always the first to sport integration with cool new technology, but it is only a matter of time until you’re using your stock Kia to make appointments and send emails with your voice. It’s the friggin’ future, you guys!

While Siri may be seen by some as more of a novelty than a vital piece of technology, this is pretty much the perfect use case for voice control. You can’t fiddle with your screen while you’re driving, and Siri really can help you send texts or set reminders while your hands are busy. A match made in heaven.

What do you think about Mercedes Benz’s attempt to woo Apple fans? Are you sold, or is this just a song and dance at this point? Sound off in the comment section so we can hear what all of you think of this story

 

Source : Auto Blog

CloudFTP – Wirelessly share ANY USB storage with iPad, iPhone

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CloudFTP is a pocket size adapter that can turn any USB storage device into a wireless file server, sharing files with WiFi-enabled devices (iPad, iPhone, computer etc.). It can also automatically connect to the Internet to backup and synchronize your USB data with popular online Cloud storage services like iCloud, Dropbox and box.net.

How It Works?

CloudFTP features a powered USB port (just like on the computer) which connects and powers any USB mass storage device (USB hard drives, flash drives, card readers, digital cameras etc.)

Ad-hoc (peer-to-peer) mode

By default, CloudFTP creates its own (ad-hoc) wireless WiFi network to share the connected USB data. Users just need to join this network from their WiFi-enabled devices to access the USB storage device wirelessly by means of a HTML5 web app, dedicated iOS/Android app or FTP client. This network works independently of the Internet and other existing wireless networks

Infrastructure (Internet) mode

Alternatively, CloudFTP can also join an existing (infrastructure) wireless WiFi network to share with devices on the same network. CloudFTP will automatically  connect to the Internet (if present) to backup/sync the USB data with popular online Cloud storage services like iCloud, Dropbox and box.net.

Features at a glance

  • Connects to any USB mass storage compliant device
  • 2600mAh li-ion rechargeable battery powers USB port and device up to 5 hours.
  • High performance, low power consumption ARM9 microprocessor
  • USB data is shared over a secure wireless IEEE 802.11b/g/n WiFi network
  • Creates its own (ad-hoc) wireless network to share and stream media for up to 3 WiFi-enabled device (e.g. iPad, iPhone, computer) at the same time.
  • Alternatively, it can join an existing (infrastructure) WiFi network to share files with other devices on the same network.
  • Automatically connect to the Internet in infrastructure WiFi mode to backup and sync data with Cloud storage services like iCloud, Dropbox, box.net.
Source : Kickstarter

 

Peel’s Amazingly Simple Universal Remote

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There are a couple of solutions on the market that combine simple hardware with an iOS app to take control of your entertainment system, but Peel is probably the coolest and most easy to use solution that we’ve played with. Peel invisibly controls your entire entertainment system — TV, cable box, Blu-ray player, AV receiver, Apple TV, and more — without the extra hassles of plugging stuff into your phone and dealing with network passwords. Normally the Peel system retails for $99

 

Peel features include:

  • Universal remote control supports thousands of TVs, Cable & Satellite DVRs, DVD and Blu-ray players, Stereos, Apple TV, and more…
  • Go from finding your shows to watching them with a single tap
  • Control your entire entertainment system with simple gestures, right from iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch
  • Change channels and volume, navigate menus, and more
  • Super simple setup with an amazingly clean and smart interface
  • Personalized TV recommendations
  • Easily switch between activities
  • Requires iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad, and the Peel app with FREE updates, available on the iTunes App Store
  • Requires Wi-Fi router with an available ethernet port
  • One-year limited warranty

Source : CultofMac /Peel.com

 

 

This $35 Computer-On-A-Stick Is All You Need To Bring AirPlay To Any HDTV

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This is a quick fix solution for AirPlay without the Apple TV device meaning u can now connect to your TV wirelessly with the help of this device. Ignore the technical part in the post just focus on what it can do

The Rasp­bery Pi project is a dar­ling lit­tle exer­cise in inge­nu­ity. It looks like a USB thumb drive, but instead of 2GB of flash, it’s a fully func­tion­al com­put­er run­ning Debian Linux, fea­tur­ing a 700 MHz ARM 11 proces­sor, 128 MB of RAM, a USB port, and an Eth­er­net port… all for just $35. Splen­did, splen­did geek­i­ness. Hang­ing this from your car keys, you can lit­er­al­ly get con­nect­ed any­where. But where’s the Apple angle?

Video link – here

It’s a lit­tle hacky in the video above, but as you can see, one of the Rasp­ber­ry Pi devel­op­ers was suc­cess­ful in hook­ing the device up to an HDMI-connected TV, then get­ting Air­play Video pump­ing through it via his iPad.

Awe­some. This is an Air­Play solu­tion for your tele­vi­sion that is $65 cheap­er than an Apple TV. The only prob­lem is that while the Rasp­ber­ry Pi is in pro­duc­tion, there’s still no ship date, so if you’re look­ing to graft Air­Play onto your exist­ing set, you’ll have to wait a lit­tle bit longer.

Source : Cult of Mac / raspberrypi.org